Adaptation Actions

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1 - After a cyclone, pile tubers and fresh foods in a hole, the foods will begin to rot, but moisture will eventually drain out and the dried foods can be eaten
2 - After a cyclone, bring Fiji taro to bush kitchen, keep in a dry place, and constantly rotate so that is does not constantly lay on one side
3 - After a cyclone, build a yam shelter raised off the ground, that is cool and dry
4 - Practice fruit drying
5 - Practice preserve/jam making
6 - Dry nangai and natapoa for long term usage
7 - Dry breadfruit for long term use
8 - Produce flour for long term use
9 - Collect wild tubers for consumption after cyclones
58 - Plant less susceptible grasses like Glycine, Signal, Guinea and Koronea grasses which may be affected by salt for 2-3 weeks after the storm, but then will recover.
59 - Plant wind breaks near pastures that are coastal, already salt tolerant species
413 - Use Open and deep hole planting of Taro, dig a deep hole, place taro inside, do not bury so as to allow air cooling of the growing taro.
414 - Use low tight staking of yam vines that will not allow excessive drying out
415 - Bury harvested cassava to preserve it before consumption
416 - Learn how to make Manioc Flour (Modern & traditional methods) so that harvested tubers can be preserved for extended periods.
417 - Dig the yam, but leave it in an open hole in well drained dry ground. Cover the hole with coconut leaves.
418 - Re Bury harvested taro in well drained/sandy soil.
419 - Practice alley cropping, to provide cooling shade to vulnerable crops
420 - Practice temporary alley cropping with taro to avoid extreme temperature stress
421 - Practice fallow improvement to shade individual high value crops