Adaptation Actions

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1 - After a cyclone, pile tubers and fresh foods in a hole, the foods will begin to rot, but moisture will eventually drain out and the dried foods can be eaten
2 - After a cyclone, bring Fiji taro to bush kitchen, keep in a dry place, and constantly rotate so that is does not constantly lay on one side
3 - After a cyclone, build a yam shelter raised off the ground, that is cool and dry
4 - Practice fruit drying
5 - Practice preserve/jam making
6 - Dry nangai and natapoa for long term usage
7 - Dry breadfruit for long term use
8 - Produce flour for long term use
9 - Collect wild tubers for consumption after cyclones
55 - Thoroughly inspect all bullock fencing before a cyclone to cut out any living branches on posts (i.e. purao fences)
56 - Avoid corrosive fencing materials (i.e. barb wire)
57 - Allow glycine to grow over barbed wire fences to provide a physical barrier to salt exposure
163 - Utilize appropriate building materials for livestock enclosres that can withstand climtic extremes
189 - Cross breed, select for and utilize drought resilient varieties of bullock
190 - Cross breed, select for and utilize drought resilient Rasta chickens
191 - Cross breed, select for and utilize drought resilient African chickens
192 - Utilize fast breeding African chickens
193 - Identify and relocate vulnerable species that have high risk of pest and disease attack to dryer areas
193 - Utilize chickens for meat during drought times rather than other animals
194 - Practice mixed species cropping systems to prevent rapid spread of disease