FREE ONLINE CLIMATE & DISASTER COURSES

Emergency Management (4 Weeks)

By- Massey University

Begins on- 5 January, 2015

Learn the concepts, principles and practice of Emergency Management through real-world case studies. This course will take you on a journey through contemporary risk-based emergency management. From the origins of risk management in the ancient world, to new hazards and risk management approaches of the industrial era, command and control models introduced in the Cold War era, to more contemporary “all-hazards” to current “risk management” approaches. You will explore the rapidly growing and increasingly influential discipline through a study of real-world risk understanding, reduction, readiness, response and recovery examples. You will have opportunities to discuss what you learn with other students and build and test your growing knowledge through accessible tests.
Click here to read more and access the course.

 

Climate Change (4 Weeks)

By- Macquarie University

Begins on- 5 January, 2015

Find out how climate change will affect us, why we should care about it, and what solutions we can employ. Climate change is the biggest global challenge the human race has ever faced. Our insatiable demand for energy from fossil fuels is changing the atmosphere, and in turn changing our climate. Climate change is already affecting the physical surface of the earth, the environment that provides our life support, our food supply, economy and society. These changes will accelerate over the next few decades. In this course you will explore the impacts of climate change; why we should care about them, the science that underpins our understanding and how we can fix the problem before it’s too late.

Click here to read more and access the course.

 

Climate Change: Challenges and Solutions (8 Weeks)

By- University of Exeter

Begins on- 12 January, 2015

'Climate Change: Challenges and Solutions' has been produced by eight leading academics from the University of Exeter – from mathematicians to marine biologists – and is led by Tim Lenton, Professor of Climate Change and Earth System Science, working in partnership with the UK Met Office. The aims of the course are to explain the science of climate change, the risks it poses, and the solutions available to reduce those risks. It sets contemporary human-caused climate change within the context of past nature climate variability, balancing the 'bad news' about climate change impacts on natural and human systems with the 'good news' about potential solutions. These solutions can help avoid the most dangerous climate changes and increase the resilience of societies and ecosystems to those climate changes that cannot be avoided.

Click here to read more and access the course.

 

Disasters and Ecosystems: Resilience in a Changing Climate (13 Weeks)

By- United Nations Environment Programme (UNEP)

Begins on- 12 January, 2015

This MOOC enhances knowledge and skills for tackling complex issues such as resilience and transformation, sustainable development, ecosystem management, disaster risk reduction, climate change adaptation and how they can be operationalized. It will benefit disaster managers and practitioners, climate change adaptation professionals, development planners, project implementers and policy makers. The course will be delivered through a series of lectures and case studies, quizzes, peer-reviewed exercises, along with additional study materials provided to the students. Lectures will be available through videos as well as online documents and will be geared for students who may not have access to high speed internet so they can follow the course. Students will be provided the opportunity to enhance their critical thinking through real life and fictitious problem solving exercises. Each week will feature an international expert who will be available to respond to questions and interact with students.

Click here to read more and access the course.

 

Natural Disasters (12 Weeks)

By- McGill University

Begins on- 14 January, 2015

This course examines the science behind different types of natural disasters and our ability or inability to control and predict such events. No region on Earth is immune from natural disasters. As we gain scientific understanding into the causes and nature of such phenomena, we become better able to mitigate the effects of disasters. Yet as the world's population continues to grow, an increasingly large number of people are at risk. This course examines the science behind different types of disasters and our ability or inability to control and predict such events. From this course the student will gain an appreciation of natural disasters beyond the newspaper headlines, and will better understand how the effects of disasters can be reduced.
Click here to read more and access the course.

 

Geospatial Intelligence & the Geospatial Revolution (5 Weeks)

By- The Pennsylvania State University

Begins on- 14 January, 2015

Learn how the revolution in geospatial technology combined with the tradecraft of Geospatial Intelligence (GEOINT) have changed how we develop insights about how humans use geography, and discover the power of GEOINT. Advances in satellites, GPS, unmanned aerial systems, wireless communications, handheld computing, and the ability to automate laborious map analysis processes has transformed what used to be called geographic intelligence, or GEOINT, and the nature of the insights provided to managers and leaders. 

Click here to read more and access the course.

 

Our Earth: Its Climate, History, and Processes (5 Weeks)

By- University of Manchester

Begins on- 19 January, 2015

Develop a greater appreciation for how the air, water, land, and life formed and have interacted over the last 4.5 billion years. This course focuses on a basic science understanding that demonstrates how the processes on Earth (including biological processes) lead to natural climate changes that have shaped the planet and the path of evolution. Students are challenged to think of the Earth as an integrated system made up of water, air, ice, land, and life. For example, students learn that the Gulf Stream is not the cause of western Europe’s temperate climate. They also learn that the rise of oxygen in the atmosphere 2.5 billion years ago produced massive extinctions of life on Earth that forever altered the dominant types of single-celled life.  Students are exposed to how new scientific discoveries are made through the observations that led to plate tectonics, how the Moon formed, and why dinosaurs went extinct.
Click here to read more and access the course.

 

Introduction to Sustainability (8 Weeks)

By- University of Illinois

Begins on- 19 January, 2015

This course introduces the academic discipline of sustainability and explores how today’s human societies can endure in the face of global change, ecosystem degradation and resource limitations. This course introduces the academic approach of Sustainability and explores how today’s human societies can endure in the face of global change, ecosystem degradation and resource limitations. The course focuses on key knowledge areas of sustainability theory and practice, including population, ecosystems, global change, energy, agriculture, water, environmental economics and policy, ethics, and cultural history. This subject is of vital importance, seeking as it does to uncover the principles of the long-term welfare of all the peoples of the planet.
Click here to read more and access the course.

 

Modeling Climate Change (8 Weeks)

By- University of Chicago

Begins on- 19 January, 2015

Intended for non-specialists, this course starts with basic principles and builds to more complicated, realistic models of the Earth's climate. Bringing together insights from physics, chemistry, biology, earth and atmospheric sciences - and even some economics - this course is geared to curious enthusiasts, allowing them to work with real climate data and simulations of the earth’s changing climate. This eight-week class takes a quantitative approach to the science of global warming and will enable students to understand the greenhouse effect, the planet's carbon cycle, and how burning fossil fuel affects that cycle; and to evaluate the potential severity of humans’ impact on Earth’s climate.

Click here to read more and access the course.

 

Disaster Preparedness (6 Weeks)

By- University of Pittsburgh

Begins on- 26 January, 2015

During this course, students will gain an understanding of the Disaster Cycle, concentrating on the Mitigation Phase. They will examine disaster planning on a personal level developing a disaster plan and examine Awareness and Attitude during disasters and daily life. We will look beyond these plans towards the one aspect of survival, which will enable a person to survive when all planning has failed. Disasters, by definition, overwhelm all available resources. If all available resources are gone, only one thing will keep a person alive and that is their attitude. A persons awareness and attitude, the two are closely linked, allow a person the means to remain calm, avoid panic, and draw upon resources within and outside the person to survive when their world has failed. In truth not everyone survives in extreme circumstances; people die, but, even in death, attitude, if it cannot save you, provides some degree or comfort.
Click here to read more and access the course.

 

Resilience in Children Exposed to Trauma, Disaster and War: Global Perspectives (6 Weeks)

By- University of Minnesota

Begins on- 2 February, 2015

How do children overcome hazardous experiences to succeed in life? What can be done to protect young people at risk from trauma, war, disasters, and other adversities? Learn about the importance of fostering resilience in children at risk. This course will examine the global literature on resilience in children and youth, with a focus on core concepts, methods scholars use to study resilience, highlights of lessons learned from half a century of research, and applications to promote resilience in children whose lives are threatened by extreme adversity.
Click here to read more and access the course.

 

Caring for Vulnerable Children (6 Weeks)

By- University of Strathclyde

Begins on- 23 February, 2015

Develop an understanding of some of the approaches involved in caring for vulnerable children, with this free online course. In this course, we’ll consider what we mean by risk and vulnerability, as well as how we define good enough parenting. We’ll think about how children grow and develop, and how we can provide them with containment and security via meaningful relationships and attachments. And we’ll look at the particular skills involved in communicating with children and young people. We’ll go on to learn about the characteristics that define different methods of practice and how some approaches can help us to resist risk-averse thinking.

Click here to read more and access the course.

 

Introduction to Geospatial Technology Using QGIS (5 Weeks)

By- Green Mountain College

Begins on- 23 February, 2015

This course provides a rich introduction to the booming technology field of Geographic Information Systems, known as GIS. The GIS industry is exploding at double-digit employment and income numbers and promises employment opportunities well into the future. Students will learn the fundamentals of GIS and how to build digital maps using open source software that allows free unlimited use for private or commercial applications. All data and software required is included in the course. Topics covered in this course include GIS, cartography, remote sensing, and spatial analysis through a series of lectures and hands-on computer-based exercises. This course is designed to be used as a stand-alone course to complement other disciplines or as an entry level course into a geospatial program.
Click here to read more and access the course.

 

Turn Down the Heat: Why a 4°C Warmer World Must be Avoided (4 Weeks)

By- The World Bank

Begins on- 2 March, 2015

It is now clear that without action on climate change, the world may become 4°C warmer by the end of this century. Such an increase would threaten to roll back decades of development progress; thus, we are at a ‘make it or break it’ point in time. This course presents the most recent scientific evidence, as well as some of the opportunities for urgent action. This course also offers projections for the 21st century for droughts, heat waves and sea-level rise, with implications for food and water security, as well as possible impacts on agriculture, water availability, ecosystems and human health.
Click here to read more and access the course.

 

Water for Livable and Resilient Cities (7 Weeks)

By- Monash University

Begins on- 2 March, 2015

Water plays a central role in almost every aspect of our urban environment and quality of life in our cities. Alarmingly, the combined impacts of rapid population growth and climate change are now posing a severe threat to the liveability and resilience of our cities. However, it’s possible to design water systems that provide cities with the capacity to cope with these threats. In this free online course, you’ll hear from leading researchers and thought-leaders in Australia and internationally about key actions in delivering water sensitive cities. You’ll consider and discuss the latest solutions and concepts on urban design and modelling, climate change adaptation, behaviour change, and social and government engagement.
Click here to read more and access the course.

 

TechniCity (8 Weeks)

By- The Ohio State University

Begins on- 4 March, 2015

We live in real-time, technologically enhanced cities. Explore the sweeping changes that our cities are undergoing as a result of networks, sensors, and communication technology. We are part of the 'TechniCity'. The increasing availability of networks, sensors and mobile technologies allows for new approaches to address the challenges that our cities face. The way we understand cities is undergoing sweeping transformation, right along with the analytical tools we use to design our cities and the communication tools we use to engage people. Absorbing, studying and understanding the role of technology from a critical viewpoint allows us to generate creative ideas for improving our cities. This course begins by examining how our cities are changing. We then jump into how technology is used to engage with the public to support decision-making and the creative ways that every-day people are using technology to improve their cities. Students will be examining tools for analyzing the city. Then we move into exploring the fascinating ways that cities are using real-time, technology. 

Click here to read more and access the course.

 

Maps and the Geospatial Revolution (5 Weeks)

By- The Penn State University

Begins on- 25 March, 2015

Learn how advances in geospatial technology and analytical methods have changed how we do everything, and discover how to make maps and analyze geographic patterns using the latest tools. This course brings together core concepts in cartography, geographic information systems, and spatial thinking with real-world examples to provide the fundamentals necessary to engage with Geography beyond the surface-level. We will explore what makes spatial information special, how spatial data is created, how spatial analysis is conducted, and how to design maps so that they’re effective at telling the stories we wish to share. To gain experience using this knowledge, we will work with the latest mapping and analysis software to explore geographic problems.
Click here to read more and access the course.

 

An Introduction to Global Health (6 Weeks)

By- University of Copenhagen

Begins on- 13 April, 2015

This course will provide you with an overview of the most important health challenges facing the world today. You will gain insight into how challenges have changed over time, we will discuss the likely determinants of such changes and examine future projections. Successful international strategies and programs promoting human health will be highlighted and global health governance structures will be mapped and the role of the key actors explored. Globalization processes influence the health of individuals, societies and the function of health systems in many ways and may present opportunities but may also pose a risk to vulnerable societies. Throughout this course presentations will transcend the perspectives of individual countries and will critically discuss how global mega-trends and different sectors of society influence the health of population. Transition in health and the drivers of such transition will be core elements of this course.
Click here to read more and access the course.

 

Psychological First Aid (6 Weeks)

By- Johns Hopkins University

Begins on- 18 May, 2015

Learn to provide psychological first aid to people in an emergency by employing the RAPID model: Reflective listening, Assessment of needs, Prioritization, Intervention, and Disposition. Utilizing the RAPID model (Reflective listening, Assessment of needs, Prioritization, Intervention, and Disposition), this specialized course provides perspectives on injuries and trauma that are beyond those physical in nature. The RAPID model is readily applicable to public health settings, the workplace, the military, faith-based organizations, mass disaster venues, and even the demands of more commonplace critical events, e.g., dealing with the psychological aftermath of accidents, robberies, suicide, homicide, or community violence. In addition, the RAPID model has been found effective in promoting personal and community resilience.
Click here to read more and access the course.

 

Geodesign: Change Your World (5 Weeks)

By- The Penn State University

Begins on- 8 July, 2015

Our world is awash in facts and information, which are now easily accessible.  So why are so many bad decisions being made?  What is needed is creativity and design that brings those facts to life – to create a vision and choices as well as an understanding about the potential impacts of those choices.  The geodesign process has evolved over nearly 40 years and now combines the core concepts of design thinking with the latest in geo-spatial technologies. Geodesign is a proven form of design that uses techniques and practices from a multitude of professions to determine optimal ways to design for complex land use challenges. It is a collaborative process that capitalizes on the strengths of people with a variety of expertise to create and implement unique models to aid in the design decision-making process.
Click here to read more and access the course.

 

Climate Change Policy and Public Health (4 Weeks)

By- University of Wisconsin–Madison

Begins on- 9 November, 2015

Explore current evidence linking climate change and public health while learning the fundamental co-benefits of climate change mitigation. Evaluate policies and interventions while gaining hands on experience communicating climate science and health to policy makers and the general public. Students will hear from experts across the globe, engage with the current scientific and political literature, and gain hands on experience communicating climate change and public health messages to various audiences. They will also have the opportunity to discuss course material and current events with peers across the globe. This course will give policy and decision makers a strong foundation in the core linkages between climate and change and health, emphasizing a way forward that will have the most beneficial effects on both human health and the environment.
Click here to read more and access the course.

Ebola: Symptoms, History and Origins (2 Weeks)

By- Lancaster University

Begins on- 2 February, 2015

Learn about Ebola, its symptoms, where it came from and what the current outbreak has taught us, with this free online course. In this free online course, we’ll learn more about the virus that causes Ebola and the symptoms of the disease. We’ll also be tracing the current outbreak from its early cases to the most recent infections. Over two weeks, we’ll consider what can be done to stop the spread of the virus and how we can treat those infected, in terms of general care, drugs and vaccines. We’ll also learn about the genetic structure of the virus, looking at some of its proteins; where it came from and where it may reside between outbreaks; and its evolutionary history.

Click here to read more and access the course.

 

Ebola in Context: Understanding Transmission, Response and Control (2 Weeks)

By- London School of Hygiene & Tropical Medicine

Begins on- 19 January, 2015

In 2014, Ebola went from a scarcely known virus to the subject of daily news reports. The epidemic in West Africa has quickly surpassed all previous outbreaks, to become an unprecedented humanitarian crisis. In this free online course, we’ll look at the science behind the Ebola outbreak, to understand why it has occurred on this scale and how it can be controlled. Over two weeks, we’ll explore the principles of infectious disease transmission and the social context of the Ebola epidemic. We’ll look at treatment and control measures- from those already in place to those planned - and the challenges of implementation and innovation in an emergency.
Click here to read more and access the course.

 

Understanding the Ebola Virus and How You Can Avoid It

By- Advance Learning

Always Available

An outbreak of the Ebola virus has occurred in West African countries, and infected individuals have died in Spain and America. The mortality rate from the Ebola virus is extremely high and an outbreak of the virus can have serious consequences for the health of individuals who are infected by it, and on the health resources of communities and countries where the outbreak occurs. This course will be of great interest to any learner who lives in or near regions where an outbreak of the Ebola virus has occurred and who would like to learn more about the virus and how to avoid becoming infected. It will also be of great interest to all health workers would like a free resource to help individuals and communities better understand the Ebola virus and how an outbreak of it can be controlled.

Click here to read more and access the course.

 

CPR, AED and First Aid

By- National Health Care Provider Solutions

Always Available

CPR, AED and First Aid will prepare you to respond to life-threatening emergencies in multiple populations with life-saving interventions. This CPR and First Aid course is based on the latest guidelines which focus on doing several tasks simultaneously as part of a group process that enables efficiency and minimization of error. At the completion of this course, students will be prepared to take the certification exam for CPR, AED and First Aid.
Click here to read more and access the course.

 

Sphere Handbook in Action

By- The Sphere Project

Always Available

An e-learning course that allows humanitarian workers to undertake an ambitious training programme on Sphere principles and standards in an autonomous manner is now available via the Internet. The course aims to increase the understanding and effective use of the Sphere Handbook, Humanitarian Charter and Minimum Standards in Humanitarian Response. For the time being, the course is available in English; Arabic, French and Spanish versions are in the making. The Sphere Handbook in Action e-learning course brings the Handbook to life through the use of realistic scenarios, helping the learner to get acquainted with its core messages and to understand how to use it holistically. Taking the course is free of charge.
Click here to read more and access the course.

 

Building a Better Response

By- Humanitarian Academy at Harvard

Always Available

The Humanitarian Academy at Harvard, in partnership with the International Medical Corps and Concern Worldwide, has developed an e-learning certificate course for professionals as part of the “Building a Better Response:  Strengthening Non-Governmental Organization (NGO) Capacity and Engagement in the International Humanitarian Architecture” project.  The course uses interactive tools and scenario-based teaching to build the capacity for national and international NGO personnel to engage with the humanitarian systems in a manner that improves coordination and response to the needs of affected populations.
Click here to read more and access the course.

 

Different Needs - Equal Opportunities: Increasing Effectiveness of Humanitarian Action for Women, Girls, Boys and Men

By- Inter-Agency Standing Committee

Always Available

This online course provides the basic steps a humanitarian worker must take to ensure gender equality in programming. The course includes information on the core issues of gender and how it relates to other aspects of humanitarian response. The three hour, self-paced course provides information and scenarios which enable you to practice developing gender-sensitive programming. This training is based on the Inter-Agency Standing Committee (IASC) Gender Handbook and related IASC guidelines, including the Guidelines for Gender-based Violence Interventions in Humanitarian Settings and others. The IASC consists of twenty-one humanitarian organizations and is the primary humanitarian forum for facilitating coordination, policy development and decision-making in response to complex emergencies and natural disasters.
Click here to read more and access the course.

 

Advanced Training Program on Humanitarian Action (ATHA) Courses

By- Humanitarian Academy at Harvard

Always Available

The Advanced Training Program on Humanitarian Action (ATHA) seeks to build operational capacity, facilitate learning across organizations in the humanitarian sector, and to mobilize change through a community of practice.
Click here to read more and access the course.

 

Toward Resilience - Principles in Practice

By- DisasterReady.Org

Always Available

The Emergency Capacity Building Project’s Toward Resilience Guide has emerged as the ‘go to’ resource on incorporating disaster risk reduction & climate change adaptation principles into relief and development programming. Toward Resilience: Principles in Practice is a 75 minute e-learning course that helps learners understand how these principles can be put into practice in areas where communities are threatened by hazards and the effects of climate change. Based on three real world case studies, the companion course illustrates the benefits and key elements of an integrated approach to building resilience to disaster and climate change risk.
Click here to read more and access the course.

 

Introductory e-Course on Climate Change

By- UN CC:Learn e-Learning Platform

Always Available

UN-Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon has called climate change the “defining challenge of our time” and in many countries the impacts of it are already felt. At the same time, it is still very difficult for many people not working directly on the subject to understand the basics of climate change. For example, which gases are actually contributing to the greenhouse gas effect? What temperature change is projected for this century? How does the international climate change negotiation process work? What adaptation and mitigation options are available and how to select the most adequate ones? Where does the financing come from? This free-of charge e-course will provide “everything you need to know” about the basics of climate change.

Click here to read more and access the course.

 

Planning for Community Based Adaptation (CBA) to Climate Change

By- Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO)

Always Available

The e-learning tool 'Planning for Community Based Adaptation (CBA) to Climate Change' supports training on community-based climate change adaptation in agriculture. The tool links research-based knowledge on climate change impacts with examples and experiences on CBA drawn from FAO field projects and a range of country-specific case studies. The intended outcome of the tool is to assist all actors, who face the challenge of initiating and facilitating adaptation processes at community level. This tool is designed for development practitioners, specifically national agricultural extension workers, community based organizations and field level professionals who are interested in improving their understanding of climate change adaptation in agriculture.

Click here to read more and access the course.

 

Personal Emergency Preparedness: Planning for the Public Health Worker (More Courses)

By- National Center for Disaster Preparedness, Columbia University

Always Available

The public health workforce increasingly provides direct and indirect roles and functions during their agency’s emergency response. A most critical element of being professionally prepared is to be personally prepared. This course introduces the learner to a variety of public health roles during a wide range of emergencies. Using an interactive, 5 action-step preparedness model learners will become better prepared for emergencies and disasters, personally and professionally. Three emergency scenarios allow the learner to think through each situation and identify the action steps most helpful to get through the emergency.
Click here to read more and access the course.

 

First Aid for Free

By- First Aid for Free!
Always Available
Firstaidforfree.com is a free online first aid resource, with a mission to increase awareness of first aid & lifesaving skills. We provide a free online first aid course, which anybody can work through from the comfort of their own home. Also, our first aid blog can keep you updated on the latest first aid news & updates. Each of our first aid course modules ends in a quiz so you can check your knowledge. After you have completed all the modules you can download a free online first aid certificate in PDF format. Please note you’ll need to register an account with us before you can access our free online first aid course. Firstaidforfree.com was setup by John, a first aid trainer & lifeguard of many years. Frustrated by the lack of free, reliable & accurate first aid information available on the internet, John set out to develop a number of interactive first aid resources.
Click here to read more and access the course.

 

Personal Safety and Health for Emergency Responders (More Courses)

By- School of Public Health, University of Albany

Always Available

As a responder, you put yourself in harm’s way in order to help others. Emergencies can occur at any time, often without warning. While rescue and recovery work can be rewarding, response workers are not immune from the physical and psychological toll of disasters. In order to respond safely, you must be prepared, and train for your response regularly. If you become sick, injured or are ill prepared during a response, you may actually hinder the rescue effort. If you are a volunteer, you have made a commitment to be ready to respond in an emergency. If you are an employee of a health department, hospital, or clinic, this emergency response may be part of your expectations as an employee. This course will help the emergency responder understand the types of dangers that may be encountered in a disaster setting, as well as the common injuries and other health impacts that can be sustained during an emergency response. This course will also examine various health and safety preparedness measures a responder may take before, during, and after an emergency.
Click here to read more and access the course.

 

Fundamentals of GIS for Conservation

By- The Nature Conservancy

Always Available

The Fundamentals of GIS for Conservation is comprised of six self-paced courses focusing on the fundamentals of GIS for conservation. Each course has several learning components, ranging from podcasts to web-based trainings, to help students gain knowledge on a specific topic. At the end of each course please take the course survey, and with a successful completion you will receive a course certificate. Note: Courses will highlight both ArcGIS 10.1 and ArcGIS 9.3.
Click here to read more and access the course.

 

Health Care in Danger

By- International Committee of the Red Cross (ICRC)

Always Available

Are you a doctor wondering how to interact with the media, or a nurse wondering how to treat patient information in difficult circumstances? Are you an ambulance driver unsure of what your responsibilities are? Are you a hospital administrator wondering what to do with overwhelming numbers of deceased patients? If so, the Health Care in Danger project's new e-learning module on the responsibilities of health-care personnel is for you.
Click here to read more and access the course.

 

Other "reasonably" good courses for Development Professionals...

 

Becoming a Confident Trainer (4 Weeks)

By- University of South Australia
Begins on- 5 January, 2015
Confidence as a trainer comes from the knowledge that you are well prepared in your topic and the resources you’ll use to present your information. Confidence, is also understanding that an effective trainer is someone who presents in a professional manner, is an effective communicator and has developed an awareness of the learning needs of their learner group. In this course, we’d like to share with you our combined experience in the vocational education sector working with adult learners. Our focus will be on the more practical aspects of training and facilitation and we’d like to draw on some of the skills and knowledge we've gained through our respective training careers to offer you some practical techniques, approaches, hints and suggestions that you may be able to apply to your own training environment. Whether you’re an experienced trainer or just starting out, this course aims to develop the skills that you already have and help you become a more confident and accomplished vocational educator.
Click here to read more and access the course.

 

Forests and Livelihoods in Developing Countries (6 Weeks)

By- University of British Columbia

Begins on- 6 January, 2015

This interdisciplinary course explores the complex interactions between poverty, rural livelihoods, and forest resources in developing countries.  We will consider some of the dynamics that occur when impoverished people use forests in their daily lives. We will talk about the role of forests for medicines and wild foods, as sources of fuel-wood and charcoal for energy, and other pressing topics that confront sustainable forest management such as the impacts of human health and diseases on forests. The course consists of modules on forests and livelihoods in developing countries, agro-forestry, human health in forested environments, protected areas and their sustainability, small and medium forest enterprises (SMFEs), and  community forestry. Three cross-cutting themes (gender, tenure and forest rights, and climate change) will span all of the modules. This course will engage you in developing a deeper understanding of the fundamental importance of forest resources in the lives and livelihoods of people in developing countries. Participants from tropical and developing countries may have lived much of what we will talk about in this course, and your experiences will deepen our understanding of the course material. Participants not from a developing country will gain a much better appreciation for the multitude of ways that people in developing countries use forest resources.
Click here to read more and access the course.

 

Make an Impact: Sustainability for Professionals (6 Weeks)

By- University of Bath

Begins on- 12 January, 2015

As a student on this course you will be involved in investigating a n

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